EXPO 2020 German Campus

The German pavilion is one of the few that very generously lets in natural light into the interior. We defined and fine-tuned the design for the upper lighting in terms of number of fixtures, distribution and the transmittance of the glass in multiple simulations. The passage of light through clear glass and the breakthrough of direct sunbeams are desired and intentionally made possible. We used films to show how the cones of lights will move through the interior space. Only the center stage is shaded from the spots of sunlight.

No other pavilion at the EXPO 2020 was given such an intense natural lighting design. It was a statement about the sustainable use of natural light.

Related projects

    • UAE Pavilion EXPO 2020

      Project

      As the host, the UAE's pavilion is one of the main buildings at the EXPO and one of great significance.
      The design is inspired by a falcon with upward soaring wings, which are fitted with photovoltaics. During the day they are closed and the solar cells tilt toward the sky and at night they open up and display illuminated inner surfaces.
      The entire pavilion is monochrome white and is given structure through light. The free-form ceiling of the vast interior is made legible by the double-curved lines of light and captures the iconographic character of the interior space.
      The adjoining rooms are very complex ranging from underground parking garages, VVIP rooms and underground entrances to a tunnel connecting the pavilion directly with the Royal Pavilion. Not only did the lighting designers illuminate the interior spaces, but also the building's exterior, the gardens and all of the adjacent areas. The details for the installation were extraordinarily intricate and the highest priority was placed on the invisibility of the luminaires.
      Santiago Calatrava wanted only light and structure without any lighting fixtures whatsoever.

      Building type
      Cul­ture
      Location
      Asia, United Arab Emirates, Dubai
      Project time frame
      2016 — 2021
    • Palace of Berlin – Humboldtforum

      Project

      The lighting design firm Lichtvision was commissioned to develop a concept to illuminate the facades of the Humboldt Forum. The result was an intentional lighting of the facades in terms of intensities of illumination and their distribution.
      The lighting design bathes the building in a uniform light. It accentuates the mighty presence of the Royal Palace in the heart of Berlin. The flat evenness of the light without much shadowing places priority on the building's three-dimensionality over its details so that it appears imposing and grand, especially from a distance. The height of the light points is necessary to avoid casting hard shadows and to create a uniform lighting.
      The designers' lighting specifications were based on standard luminaires. Their design then needed to be integrated into the light columns that also illuminated the exterior areas. KARDORFF was commissioned with achieving these two tasks by using one type of light column.
      First, the positions for the light columns were chosen by Kardorff Ingenieure to ensure that the entrances and views of the palace remained unobstructed. The desired light distribution at the defined positions had to be recalculated for the luminaires that can be used in Selux's LIF light column. The LIF light column was custom designed by Kardorff Ingenieure and has highly complex facade modules which can precisely aim individual LED using many separately adjustable deflective mirrors.
      This made it possible to achieve the same lighting effect even with another product and at other positions than Lichtvision had originally designed.
      As a result, the illumination of the square and the facade have been integrated into one luminaire.

      Building type
      Mon­u­ment, Cul­ture, Mu­se­um, Ur­ban Space, Lu­mi­naire
      Location
      Europe, Germany, Berlin
      Project time frame
      2018 — 2022
    • Qatar Pavilion EXPO 2020

      Project

      The lighting design brings out the size and form of the architects' building. To do this, curved linear RGBW luminaires were positioned in parallel about 3.5 meters in front of the facade to spotlight the surfaces. Since pools of water are directly adjacent to these facade areas, underwater lights had to be used. To enable uniform lighting, the curved luminaires at the entrance were also used in a linear floor channel with a glass cover.
      The rooftop surfaces tilting toward the visitors were illuminated with RGBW spots that are mounted on a special tower structure on top of the pavilion.
      This 18-meter-high tower with an open lamellar structure is illuminated by recessed ground luminaires that brighten the inner surfaces and make the structure's silhouette visible from a distance.
      For the interior, the architects designed a curved ceiling into which linear RGBW profiles have been integrated. It was designed so that the luminaires could be mounted in a concealed manner, and the V-shaped structure appears to shine from inside itself, indirectly illuminating the space.

      Building type
      Cul­ture
      Location
      Asia, United Arab Emirates, Dubai
      Project time frame
      2021 — 2022
    • Bucerius Artforum

      Project

      Next to Hamburg's City Hall is a special kind of art museum: The Bucerius Kunst Forum does not have its own collection. It hosts temporary exhibits of loaned artworks and thus requires completely flexible lighting. The museum was advised for many years by Harry Mayer on all aspects involving light. He wished that the special spotlights be retained in the new rooms. So we integrated spots into recessed light channels alongside the luminous ceiling panels. We designed the light channels to have full access to the spotlights so that they can be optimally adjusted. A specially designed extruded aluminum sheath integrates the mounting positions for the luminous ceiling panels making it possible to achieve very fine and precise details. A 3-D spatial analysis has found that it is possible to perfectly illuminate every artform and arrangement.

      Building type
      Mu­se­um, Cul­ture
      Location
      Europe, Germany, Hamburg
      Project time frame
      2020
    • House of One

      Project

      On the foundations of the old Petri Church in Berlin, a new sacred building is being built that will unite the three monotheistic world religions of Judaism, Christianity and Islam under one roof. It will be a house of encounter, for people of different religions to get to know each other and exchange ideas. Three sacred rooms are arranged around a central domed room. Above this, the building opens up to the city with a loggia and offers views over Berlin.

      For the imposing dome room in the centre of the building, we developed a discreet wall luminaire with several lighting components. This allows us to illuminate the entire room as well as the dome in a balanced way with just a few luminaires. A universal luminaire in the same aesthetics, also developed by us, provides uniform illumination of the circulation areas throughout the building. In the sacred rooms, skylights optimised by us with different characteristics create an appropriate room atmosphere with daylight. At night, this is taken over by the precisely planned room lighting consisting of simple pendant and surface-mounted luminaires.

      Building type
      Mon­u­ment, Cul­ture, Lu­mi­naire
      Location
      Europe, Germany, Berlin
      Project time frame
      2019 — 2021